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How Does a Dispersion Compensating Fiber Reduce Chromatic Dispersion?

Posted by George Zhu on Thu, Apr 27, 2017 @ 16:04 PM

An important factor in the performance of fiber optic communications systems, chromatic dispersion is a topic and performance characteristic that is important to both understand and account for when operating and/or designing equipment for fiber-based networks.

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Topics: chromatic dispersion, dispersion compensating fiber, optical fiber, refractive index, dispersion compensating module

Buying Optical Fiber for Network Testing and Latency Applications

Posted by Kevin Miller on Fri, Mar 31, 2017 @ 15:03 PM

When the time comes to buy spools of optical fiber for testing and demonstrating communications systems, there are a few items to consider that will help ensure you end up with an ideal setup.  Since it has been proven that following a few best practices will help you get the most out of your fiber, thinking about these four important items in advance will allow you to further qualify your needs as well as speed up the purchasing process.

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Topics: fiber network simulation, fiber latency, optical time delay, network simulation, optical fiber, fiber spools, buy optical fiber

What Is Optical Fiber?

Posted by Tiffany San Souci on Thu, Jun 9, 2016 @ 09:06 AM

Optical fiber is made by drawing glass or plastic to a desired length and diameter (slightly larger than a human hair).  This flexible and highly pure fiber is most commonly used to transmit light for a wide range of applications including visible light displays, sensors, and high-speed communications networks which we will discuss in this article.

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Topics: optical fiber, optical fibers, single mode optical fiber, multimode optical fiber

What Does Your Optical Fiber Test & Demonstration Setup Say About You?

Posted by Kevin Miller on Thu, May 12, 2016 @ 09:05 AM

Often not considered, it is important to remember that looks really do matter!

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Topics: optical fiber, fiber spools, fiber latency, fiber network simulation, fiber test, buy optical fiber

The Positive Impact of Using Optical Fibers on Cell Towers

Posted by Jonathan Tuck on Wed, Sep 2, 2015 @ 14:09 PM

While fiber optic technology has been utilized for many years in the communications industry, consumers generally identify with the role that it plays in wired communications such as Cable TV, Fiber-To-The-Home, and the related networking equipment.  However, what most overlook or do not realize is the significant impact that deploying optical fibers has also had on something consumers use every day – mobile devices.  In order to achieve the high speed data levels that we have become accustomed to when using mobile devices, cell towers and their supporting networks had to be retrofitted with optical fiber cables.

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Topics: fiber cable, optical fiber, cell towers

Get The Most Out Of Bare Optical Fiber Spools

Posted by Kevin Miller on Thu, Apr 4, 2013 @ 17:04 PM

If your company is like most that are involved with building or utilizing fiber optic systems, chances are you have a few spools of bare optical fiber laying around the lab.  Since it is critical to ensure fiber-based equipment works as intended prior to deployment in the field, it is a recommended and common practice for engineers to simulate networks using spools of bare optical fiber.  Because there have been a variety of different fibers available over the years, engineers can end up with fair amount of spools at their disposal.

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Topics: fiber spools, optical fiber, optical fibers, optical fiber spools, bare optical fiber

Reducing Rack Space with New, High-Density Optical Taps

Posted by OJ Johnston on Mon, Oct 15, 2012 @ 17:10 PM

As virtualization and cloud applications become more and more prevalent in Data Centers, POPs, Head-ends, and Central Offices, the available rack space needed to house the equipment for these applications is shrinking.  While the space needed to store, process, route, or switch the data becomes more compact, one thing that remains difficult to reduce is the physical layer infrastructure. As traffic enters or exits a facility, most providers want the capability to monitor what is being delivered or sent to/from their site. At the larger sites, this data traffic is riding on fiber, and in many cases, there are a number of fibers coming into or out of a given site. To be able to accurately monitor this traffic, a passive optical tap is used to duplicate the traffic and send it to a monitoring device that can analyze the header information native to the traffic type.  In the past, these optical taps were relatively expensive and bulky. Even today, most vendors cannot provide more than 24 taps in a single 1RU footprint. 

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Topics: optical fiber, m2 optics, optical tap, optical taps, fiber tap, network tap, SplitLight, optical splitter, high density

Best Practices for Simulating a Physical Fiber Optic Network

Posted by Kevin Miller on Fri, Mar 23, 2012 @ 10:03 AM

This new, free whitepaper from M2 Optics Inc. discusses the importance of simulating a physical fiber optic network in the laboratory and best practices for achieving maximum results.
 

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Topics: optical fiber, m2 optics, 100G, optical fiber spools, network simulation, fiber optic network simulator

Calculating Optical Fiber Latency

Posted by Kevin Miller on Mon, Jan 9, 2012 @ 15:01 PM

Latency is a term that is used to describe a time delay in a transmission medium such as a vacuum, air, or a fiber optic waveguide.  In free space, light travels at 299,792,458 meters per second.  This equates to 299.792 meters per microsecond (µs) or 3.34µs per kilometer.  In fiber optics, the latency of the fiber is the time it takes for light to travel a specified distance through the glass core of the fiber.  Light moving through the fiber optic core will travel slower than light through a vacuum because of the differences of the refractive index of light in free space and in the glass.

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Topics: optical fiber, time delay, fiber latency, fiber optic latency, refractive index, calculate latency, fiber optic delay

OTDR Launch Fibers - Importance and Usage

Posted by Kevin Miller on Tue, Nov 29, 2011 @ 14:11 PM

An Optical Time Domain Reflectometer (OTDR) is an optical measurement instrument designed to detect faults, splices and bends in optical fiber cables.  It functions by launching pulses of light into the optical fiber and measuring the back reflections created by the faults, splices, and bends.  It can identify the exact location of the fault by measuring the round trip time from the launch to the detection of the reflected returning pulse.  The time is determined by the speed of light in the glass core of the optical fiber.

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Topics: optical fiber, otdr, launch fiber, dead zone, launch box, otdr launch